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Origins


As the world begins to truly reckon with the immensity of the threat, and our movement grows to the scale of the problem, we ask ourselves what could move millions of us through our fear and grief and into action? What, in a word, is the Climate Justice movement's equivalent of the AIDS Memorial Quilt? Our answer: The Climate Ribbon — a massive public art installation and ritual space to grieve all that we stand to lose to Climate Chaos.

On September 21st, 2014, as the United Nations prepared to meet for yet another summit on climate change to produce yet another hollow treaty, over 400,000 people converged in New York City for what was the largest march against Climate Chaos in world history. The launch of the Climate Ribbon was the culminating art installation at the People’s Climate March: a Tree of Life sculpture hung with thousands of ribbons telling stories about everything we most cherish that Climate Chaos threatens to wipe away: The Gulf Coast, next year’s harvest, the future of our children’s children, the bees, clean air and water…

The Climate Ribbon project invites people around the country, and the world, to share these stories and thread them together. Collectively, these ribbons compose a kind of “people’s treaty,” inspired in part by Northeastern Native American quahog and whelk shell wampum belts that signify the mutual exchange of trust that takes place when commitments are made between peoples. 

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Origins


As the world begins to truly reckon with the immensity of the threat, and our movement grows to the scale of the problem, we ask ourselves what could move millions of us through our fear and grief and into action? What, in a word, is the Climate Justice movement's equivalent of the AIDS Memorial Quilt? Our answer: The Climate Ribbon — a massive public art installation and ritual space to grieve all that we stand to lose to Climate Chaos.

On September 21st, 2014, as the United Nations prepared to meet for yet another summit on climate change to produce yet another hollow treaty, over 400,000 people converged in New York City for what was the largest march against Climate Chaos in world history. The launch of the Climate Ribbon was the culminating art installation at the People’s Climate March: a Tree of Life sculpture hung with thousands of ribbons telling stories about everything we most cherish that Climate Chaos threatens to wipe away: The Gulf Coast, next year’s harvest, the future of our children’s children, the bees, clean air and water…

The Climate Ribbon project invites people around the country, and the world, to share these stories and thread them together. Collectively, these ribbons compose a kind of “people’s treaty,” inspired in part by Northeastern Native American quahog and whelk shell wampum belts that signify the mutual exchange of trust that takes place when commitments are made between peoples. 

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The Team


Project Designers
Gan Golan: Visual Artist & Organizer; most recently designer of the ONE NYC FOR ALL OF US project. 
Andrew Boyd: Creative Interventionist; co-founder of Beautiful Trouble & Billionaires for Bush.
Rae Abileah: Social change strategist, community organizer, and ritual designer. Former co-director of CODEPINK; former Training Director at Beautiful Trouble. 

Kate McNeely: Storyteller. Founding member of People’s Climate Arts, Rising Tide NYC, 5 Borough Ladies Arm Wrestling/New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling, White Noise NYC.

Andy Wanning: Project coordinator. Former UN Representative, Tribal Link Foundation.

Paris Team
Sandrine Catteau: Organizer, Member of Pour Le Collectif Climat des Lilas
David Ledorze: Artist, Member of Pour Le Collectif Climat des Lilas

The Team


Project Designers
Gan Golan: Visual Artist & Organizer; most recently designer of the ONE NYC FOR ALL OF US project. 
Andrew Boyd: Creative Interventionist; co-founder of Beautiful Trouble & Billionaires for Bush.
Rae Abileah: Social change strategist, community organizer, and ritual designer. Former co-director of CODEPINK; former Training Director at Beautiful Trouble. 

Kate McNeely: Storyteller. Founding member of People’s Climate Arts, Rising Tide NYC, 5 Borough Ladies Arm Wrestling/New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling, White Noise NYC.

Andy Wanning: Project coordinator. Former UN Representative, Tribal Link Foundation.

Paris Team
Sandrine Catteau: Organizer, Member of Pour Le Collectif Climat des Lilas
David Ledorze: Artist, Member of Pour Le Collectif Climat des Lilas

Advisory Circle


Alli Chagi-Starr: Creative changemaker, Fellowship Director for BALLE, co-founder of Art and Revolution, Dancers Without Borders, and myriad other arts activist and movement building initiatives.  
Betsy Richards: Senior Creative Fellow at The Opportunity Agenda and enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.
Bryan Welch: Educator in residence at Lower East Side Girls Club in NYC.
Caroline Casey: Radio host, visionary activist, ritual weaver. 
Clayton Thomas-Mueller, of the Mathais Colomb Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, is an activist, writer, public speaker, facilitator and activist for indigenous self-determination and environmental justice.
Dana Balicki: Transformational coach, engagement strategist, activist, former organizer with Occupy Wall Street and CODEPINK
Diane Wilson: Shrimper-woman and environmental activist from Seadrift, TX.
Gibrán Rivera: National expert in process design and facilitation in service to those committed to social transformation. Senior Associate at the Interaction Institute; Lead Coach at the Thrive Workshop. 
Ileia Burgos: Community Organizer, Rockaway Wildfire
Jodie Evans: Co-Founder, CODEPINK; Board Member, RAN. 
John Sellers: Executive Director of the Other 98%; long-time creative campaigner.
Josh Healey: Youth organizer and award-winning writer, performer & creative activist. Currently the Culture Shift Fellow for Movement Generation Justice and Ecology Project. 
Liz Maxwell: Chief Dot Connector, US Dept of Arts and Culture
Lizz Winstead: Founder of the Daily Show.
Mary-Kathryn Nagle: Award-winning playwright whose next play, Fairly Traceable, documents the intersections of climate change and indigenous communities. Citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and an honorary member of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. 
Michael Premo: Long-time NYC economic justice organizer. Co-Founder of Sandy Storyline; organizer with Housing is a Human Right, and Community Voices Heard. 
Nadine Bloch: Creative activist, organizer, and Training Director at Beautiful Trouble. 
Rabbi Jill Hammer, PhD: Director of Spiritual Education at the Academy for Jewish Religion, Co-founder of the Kohenet Hebrew Priestess Institute, author, teacher, and ritualist. 
Rachel Falcone: Co-Founder of Sandy Storyline; organizer with Housing is a Human Right. 
Raquel de Anda: Independent Curator in art, urbanism, social practice and the networks between.
Ravi Ragbir: Organizer, NY Immigration Coalition
Ret. Col. Ann Wright: Veteran, former US diplomat, outspoken environmental and social justice advocate and anti-war organizer
Sarah Chandler: Director of Earth-Based Spiritual Programming at Isabella Freedman Center and Hazon.

Advisory Circle


Alli Chagi-Starr: Creative changemaker, Fellowship Director for BALLE, co-founder of Art and Revolution, Dancers Without Borders, and myriad other arts activist and movement building initiatives.  
Betsy Richards: Senior Creative Fellow at The Opportunity Agenda and enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.
Bryan Welch: Educator in residence at Lower East Side Girls Club in NYC.
Caroline Casey: Radio host, visionary activist, ritual weaver. 
Clayton Thomas-Mueller, of the Mathais Colomb Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, is an activist, writer, public speaker, facilitator and activist for indigenous self-determination and environmental justice.
Dana Balicki: Transformational coach, engagement strategist, activist, former organizer with Occupy Wall Street and CODEPINK
Diane Wilson: Shrimper-woman and environmental activist from Seadrift, TX.
Gibrán Rivera: National expert in process design and facilitation in service to those committed to social transformation. Senior Associate at the Interaction Institute; Lead Coach at the Thrive Workshop. 
Ileia Burgos: Community Organizer, Rockaway Wildfire
Jodie Evans: Co-Founder, CODEPINK; Board Member, RAN. 
John Sellers: Executive Director of the Other 98%; long-time creative campaigner.
Josh Healey: Youth organizer and award-winning writer, performer & creative activist. Currently the Culture Shift Fellow for Movement Generation Justice and Ecology Project. 
Liz Maxwell: Chief Dot Connector, US Dept of Arts and Culture
Lizz Winstead: Founder of the Daily Show.
Mary-Kathryn Nagle: Award-winning playwright whose next play, Fairly Traceable, documents the intersections of climate change and indigenous communities. Citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and an honorary member of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. 
Michael Premo: Long-time NYC economic justice organizer. Co-Founder of Sandy Storyline; organizer with Housing is a Human Right, and Community Voices Heard. 
Nadine Bloch: Creative activist, organizer, and Training Director at Beautiful Trouble. 
Rabbi Jill Hammer, PhD: Director of Spiritual Education at the Academy for Jewish Religion, Co-founder of the Kohenet Hebrew Priestess Institute, author, teacher, and ritualist. 
Rachel Falcone: Co-Founder of Sandy Storyline; organizer with Housing is a Human Right. 
Raquel de Anda: Independent Curator in art, urbanism, social practice and the networks between.
Ravi Ragbir: Organizer, NY Immigration Coalition
Ret. Col. Ann Wright: Veteran, former US diplomat, outspoken environmental and social justice advocate and anti-war organizer
Sarah Chandler: Director of Earth-Based Spiritual Programming at Isabella Freedman Center and Hazon.

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Witness


Witness